Sunday, February 12, 2017

Duran-Leonard I: 'The Brawl in Montreal' - Part two


Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard I: "The Brawl in Montreal." Watercolor paint and ink on 10" X 13" cold press paper. Art commission by Coyote Duran
Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard I: "The Brawl in Montreal." Watercolor paint and ink on 10" X 13" cold press paper. Art commission by Coyote Duran

When we last tuned inthen-undefeated WBC welterweight titleholder Sugar Ray Leonard was getting his head handed to him by arguably the greatest world lightweight champion of all time, Roberto Duran, fully rendered in 2H graphite on cold press watercolor paper.

Well, joy of all joys, this sucker is finished (watercolor paint and black ink) and getting prepped to send to its owner Mike Downie, in Texas. SO MANY apologies for this being so late! But it was so much fun to render! I'm so grateful for these challenge commissions!

If you don't follow me on Instagram, please check out the following process photos!


Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Duran-Leonard I: 'The Brawl in Montreal' - Part one


Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard I: "The Brawl in Montreal." Graphite (2H) on cold press watercolor paper, prior to watercolor paint and ink, 10" X 13", art commission by Coyote Duran
Roberto Duran vs Sugar Ray Leonard I: "The Brawl in Montreal." Graphite (2H) on cold press watercolor paper, prior to watercolor paint and ink, 10" X 13", art commission by Coyote Duran

It was actually almost a year ago when I created the first piece in what now would become a series for one customer, a friend of mine, Mike Downie from Texas (a watercolor and ink rendering of the classic battle between Marvelous Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns, seven minutes and 52 seconds of beautiful violence, known simply as "The War). Months later, Mike would commission a brand-new piece, evoking another classic battle from the early-1980s - June 20, 1980, to be exact - the first meeting between arguably the greatest world lightweight champion of all time, Roberto Duran, and then-undefeated WBC welterweight titleholder Sugar Ray Leonard.

The 15-round championship bout ended like few anticipated, with the villainous "Hands of Stone" holding his hands high in triumph before flipping off Leonard's then-wife Juanita. Although, Leonard would authoritatively avenge the loss, via eight-round stoppage, five months later in New Orleans, Louisiana, the ink in boxing's history books is indelible. Roberto Duran handed Sugar Ray Leonard his very first professional loss.

Now, regarding this piece, if this scene looks familiar but doesn't (if that makes sense) is because had I replicated the photo reference Mike provided, I would have had to render both Duran and Leonard much smaller, resulting in much unused space between them. So I took a little "artistic liberty" and shortened the space between the two, thus substituting Duran's long right hand, down the pipe, into something of a tight hook (more of a cross, since Duran is a right-hander). If it's difficult for you to visualize, just consider Duran's right elbow being at close to a 90-degree angle from his right fist, if that makes sense.

Again, I had to go full pencil rendering on this piece in its layout stage (with my trusty, true-blue Alvin Drafting leadholder, loaded with 2H lead on Strathmore cold-press watercolor paper), simply because it looks dope, Howlers.

Anyhoo, it's off to the paint and ink stage now but before you jet, if you haven't seen them just yet via my Instagram feed, here are the process photos:


Thursday, September 8, 2016

Bobby Chacon: Nov. 28, 1951-Sept. 7, 2016


Two-division boxing champion Bobby "Schoolboy" Chacon, ink on sketch paper by Coyote Duran, boxing art
Two-division boxing champion Bobby "Schoolboy" Chacon, ink on sketch paper by Coyote Duran


Sketchbook Chronicles No. 7: On Wednesday, Sept. 7, the boxing world learned that one of its own, former two-division champion (at featherweight and junior lightweight) and Hall-of-Famer Bobby "Schoolboy" Chacon, 59-7-1 (47), had passed  away while under hospice care.

Despite suffering the tragic losses of his wife Valerie (Chacon would fight the following day, stopping Salvador Ugalde in the third round) and son Bobby Jr. (a result of gun violence three years after Chacon retired), Chacon could still find the wherewithal to smile. That smile became the trademark of a warrior, who would gradually succumb to Pugilistica Dementia.

As simple and bold as his smile, I offer an equally simple and bold tribute to Bobby "Schoolboy" Chacon in my latest "Sketchbook Chronicles" entry, done in Micron pen and Pentel Pocket Brush Pen on sketch paper.

Rest in peace, Champ.










Questions? Comments? Complaints? Commissions? Hit me up at coyote@coyoteduran.com. You can also follow me at twitter.com/CoyoteDuraninstagram.com/coyoteduran and facebook.com/CDCreationNation.

Monday, August 22, 2016

The Four Kings of Boxing: Part one


The Four Kings of Boxing, Roberto Duran, Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvelous Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns, 2h graphite layout on 18" X 24" stretched canvas to be finished in acrylic paint. Boxing art/painting by Coyote Duran.
The Four Kings of Boxing, Roberto Duran, Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvelous Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns, 2h graphite layout on 18" X 24" stretched canvas to be finished in acrylic paint. Boxing art/painting by Coyote Duran.


On the heels of my two most recent boxing paintings (a watercolor Manny Pacquiao and an acrylic Denny Moyer), I thought I would tackle another boxing piece, prior to jumping on a commission, but I wanted to do something different, something surreal and reminiscent of a time in my youth that helped influence the artist I am today. And that time was all about comic books.

Remember the older Marvel Comics that has the panel in the upper left-hand corner that featured the faces of team members in the X-Men, Fantastic Four and the Avengers? Well, this approach somewhat reminded me of those issues in the 1970s and 1980s. This approach also features my four "comic book heroes" of boxing: Roberto Duran, Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvelous Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns. These guys represented everything right about boxing during hat time and - get this - they all fought each other. That's kind of a difficult thing to ask for in this day and age, right?

With that in mind, I wanted to work BIG (well, bigger, that is. I decided to render this piece on an 18" X 24" stretched canvas). I think, when one works as big as he or she can, it allows for better and freer attention to detail. You can also take more chances.

Now I know you're probably looking at my floating heads and thinking, "Yeah, they do look more comicky than realistic." And you would be absolutely correct! See, when the paint goes down, that's when the fun begins, like working further with values and depths, past the maximum one can lock down with just mere graphite. And sure, I could have made these fellas look more realistic in graphite; however, I also wasn't working on a graphite-finish-friendly surface (like Bristol Board, for example) and wasn't using my typical graphite pencil for finished renderings (my trusty Ebony pencil).

So in the spirit of my previous Instagram-happy blog posts, howzabout we do a recap of what's been shakin' with this piece thus far?

Friday, July 29, 2016

Welcome back, Manny Pacquiao (in watercolor and ink!)


Manny Pacquiao, 11" X 14" watercolor and ink on cold press paper. Boxing art by Coyote Duran
Manny Pacquiao, 11" X 14" watercolor and ink on cold press paper by Coyote Duran


Last time on the The Coyote Duran Show (that has a nice ring; doesn't it?), I shared what started as a Periscope broadcast (sorry for not sharing the rest, gang. I got a little...uh, carried away) that morphed into a full-blown watercolor and ink piece (on 11" X 14" cold press paper) celebrating the inevitable return of eight-division boxing champion Manny Pacquiao. Since our last meeting, I shared the buildup on Instagram!